Friday, January 18, 2008

Broadway Stagehand Strike Over After 19 Days


by Broadway.com Staff

The 19-day Broadway stagehand strike is over, after some intense days of negotiations between the Local One union and The League of American Theatres and Producers. The two sides announced a tentative agreement at a press conference on November 28, 2007. All Broadway shows will perform starting tomorrow, November 29.

The strike put 27 Broadway shows on hold since Saturday, November 10—A Bronx Tale, A Chorus Line, August: Osage County, Avenue Q, Chicago, The Color Purple, Curtains, Cyrano de Bergerac, The Drowsy Chaperone, The Farnsworth Invention, Grease, Hairspray, The Homecoming, Is He Dead? Jersey Boys, Legally Blonde, Les Miserables, The Lion King, The Little Mermaid, Mamma Mia!, The Phantom of the Opera, Rent, Rock 'n' Roll, Spamalot, Spring Awakening, The Seafarer and Wicked.

__________________________________________

PAST HEADLINES

'Grinch' To Reopen Despite Broadway Stagehand Strike

WNBC-TV
updated 8:44 a.m. ET, Thurs., Nov. 22, 2007

NEW YORK - A Manhattan judge has allowed the Broadway production of "How The Grinch Stole Christmas!" to reopen despite the stagehands strike.

At a hearing Wednesday, State Supreme Court Judge Helen Freedman granted an injunction to Running Subway Productions, the producers of "Dr. Seuss' How The Grinch Stole Christmas!"
"I think one Grinch in town in enough," Freedman said. Her ruling Wednesday came a day after she heard arguments from producers of the show and owners of the theater housing the $6 million production. Producers, citing a special contract between the show and Jujamcyn Theaters, wanted the show to go on.

'Grinch' To Reopen

The theater owners plan to appeal Freedman's decision. But unless they prevail, the "Grinch" will return with an 11 a.m. show Friday, said John Kuster, attorney for the producers. "Grinch" has a limited run, closing Jan.6.

"We got our miracle on 44th Street," said "Grinch" producer James Sanna in a statement. "We hope the League and Local 1 settle their differences so all of Broadway can be back up and running soon."

The theater's owners argued that the lockout was legal and a tactical decision by the theater in handling the strike. An attorney for the owners said his clients had no assurance that the stagehands would not walk out again if the show resumed at the St. James Theater on 44th Street, which is owned by Jujamcyn.

The ruling said that continued closing of "The Grinch" was the result of a management lockout rather than the strike, with the theater owners refusing to let the musical perform even though the stagehands union said it would work. Broadway stagehands have been on strike since Nov. 10.
The dispute between Local 1 and the League of American Theatres and Producers has closed "Grinch" and 26 other Broadway plays and musicals during the Thanksgiving holiday period.

______________________

Broadway Corporations like Disney Make Millions as Stagehands Strike to Save Homes, Jobs

November 17, 2007
by Nancy Van Ness
- USA -

I cross 42nd Street and walk up Times Square. It is a cold, windy, rainy day but I had promised to come. I continue past the army recruiting center and the police headquarters; police are out in force. I notice the New York Times building on the east side of the Square at 43rd.

The huge Clear Channel signs, some of the most prominent of those that are bright day and night cast a glow that makes the square seem like daytime 24 hours a day while flashing images. Across the way are the Disney buildings and Reuters.

I walk over to the Broadway side of the Square, go up to 44th and then to Shubert Alley and over to 45th, giving high fives and thumbs up to striking stage hands as they parade up and down between police barriers in front of the theaters.


In the city that never sleeps, Time Square glows brightly just steps away from Broadway's theaters and striking stagehands. Photograph by
Nancy Van Ness.
I stop briefly to speak with a woman as bundled up as I was against the weather, just to encourage her. Standing in front of the theater’s huge sign advertising A Chorus Line, she says they just want to hang on to what they have.

I head to a theater where, ironically, the show is about RCA’s theft of the rights to the invention of television from its inventor. It is never comfortable or convenient to man the picket lines and today is really nasty, but I had told the stage hands there I would be back today, so here I am.

I have come to see if I can get a true picture of what is going on. The endless media reports about the family from Seattle or somewhere else who had come to see The Grinch and how disappointed the children were because the stage hands had shut the show down had become intolerable to me.

Where is the story about the children whose parent is a stage hand, who will lose their house if the proposed 38% cut in jobs and pay is forced on the union? Where are our values? How can anyone’s vacation and a holiday show be more important than hard working middle class families who risk losing their income and their homes?

We are not going to see or hear that story for the simple reason that the owners of the media are the owners of Broadway, both its shows and the real estate; they just don't want us to know it. Few Americans are aware of some basic facts:
The largest grossing entity on Broadway is Disney, whose three Broadway shows the week of November 4, 2007, the last week before the strike, grossed a total of $2,205,016. Disney owns ABC.

The highest grossing show that week, which has remained at the top, earning over a million dollars a week for many weeks, was Wicked, with $1,335,757. It is produced by Universal Pictures, a subsidiary of the same company that owns NBC.
(Data about the receipts of top shows can be found here.)
The New York Times is an official partner of the League of Theater Owners and Producers, the same entity that is trying to break the stagehands' union. Its final offer would reduce their jobs and pay by 38%. (The cynicism of The Times is so blatant it’s ludicrous. On November 15th they declared that the current French transit strike was "provoked" by France's president, whereas they place the blame for the darkening of Broadway on the workers. The Times has no financial interest in French transit; it does in Broadway shows and real estate.)


Strikers walk the line in the November cold, just to hold onto what they already have - a modest middle class income. Photograph by Nancy Van Ness.
The Union, Local One of the Theatrical Stage Employees Union, has been negotiating with the League since July and has been working without a contract for some time.

They report that the League is actually making further demands, not fewer, as negotiations have lurched forward. They were finally forced to either endorse a contract that would hurt its members badly or go out on strike.

It is not in the interest of the New York Times, ABC, NBC, Reuters, or other corporate media to tell us the facts about this situation. Big corporations own Broadway and the media. They do not want to the public to know the real story and as press, they have the means of keeping people in the dark. Even people who may have known that Disney owns ABC or that the Times is a big investor in the area find it very hard to connect all the dots. And the corporate media wants to keep it that way.

I want to see the “Light”, so I went to Times Square to see for myself.

Local One is very disciplined and smart. Its president spoke to a press conference on Sunday, November 11, 2007, the day after the strike started. Not surprisingly, that conference was not widely televised or reported, but the text is available to people who search for it.

The stagehands manning the picket lines will not talk to the press or media. They can count on being misquoted and misrepresented, so why should they? They speak only through their officials. I admire their solidarity and discipline.

Many of them say they would like the general public to know the facts instead of the misrepresentations - if not outright lies - that are published by the media. The press and television news have implanted the idea that stagehand members of Local One earn a hundred and fifty thousand dollars or more a year in the minds of many Americans. The stagehands themselves say that is grossly exaggerated. For one thing, many of them do not work all year. This is not a stable office job. These workers are paid per production; so when a show closes, there goes the work. They are not making a killing, unlike corporate executives.

Some of them make a decent middle class living. As the president of Local One asked, “Why is it weird for middle class workers in America to fight for their jobs?”

Would the media present the strike favorably if the workers were starving, not “just” in danger of losing their homes? Would that make a strike okay?

Stagehands also want the general public to know that the same big corporations that control the media and many productions also own Broadway real estate. One stagehand told me about a local business that had been in the area over twenty-five years. Suddenly, the block was bought out and the rent was raised so high that the business owner couldn’t pay. In place of his former thriving small business is now another big corporate bank branch; the whole area is filled with them.

The stagehands want us to know, too, that under the contract they’ve had, they work extremely long hours, often for weeks on end without a single day off. One stagehand, a veteran of more than two decades on Broadway (with whom I swapped stories about grandchildren among other things), said that he had just worked twenty-two days straight, many of them from 8am to 10 pm. They want us to know that they are not idling along in cushy jobs, an impression that the public may be getting from statements by the League widely circulated in the media. This seasoned worker said he just wished people could be there to see what they do.


While mainstream media features disappointed families who can't see The Grinch, striking stagehands struggle to have their voices heard. Photograph by Nancy Van Ness.
They want us to know that they do not stand around, but rather they move heavy equipment, making sure it is safely installed. The work they do is often difficult physical labor which can also require great skill. It keeps everyone in a production safe.

This same vigorous and lively grandfather said that a few years ago when the musicians went out on strike, people told him that the stagehands would be next. He didn't believe them but now here he is on the line. He knows that the strike is not just about their contract but also about big corporations wanting to break the unions to exploit an unprotected work force.

The stagehands also talked to me about the corporate owners’ neglect of their beloved theaters, some of them now historic buildings. They spoke of badly needed maintenance that is not undertaken. My companion spoke with passion about how much he wants to see the dingy fa├žade of the old theater beside us cleaned.

I am 61 years old and never in my lifetime has there been so much anti-labor policy in this country. The big corporations that own Broadway and the media do not want union workers. They want to pay as little as possible and reap the greatest profits. This is part of the bigger picture of outsourcing, using contract labor, and the other ways US corporations are raising profits on the backs of those who do the work.

Local One says that cuts in stagehands’ jobs and pay will not result in lower ticket prices for the public. Instead, it will only mean greater profits for the corporate owners. Average ticket prices the week of November 4 for the three Disney shows were: Mary Poppins, $81.87; The Lion King, $89.07; The Little Mermaid, $87.17; for Wicked, $92.40. Local One also reports in its flyer handed out at picket lines that the League used a part of those ticket sales to build a $20,000,000 fund to be used against the union.

I heard an anecdote about the corporate culture of the entertainment industry from Thea Luria who was executive assistant at Loewe’s Cineplex on Fifth Avenue in 1999 and 2000. She used a company pass to go to one of its cinemas to see a film and was stunned to find that a small bottle of water that would have cost no more than a dollar elsewhere was sold for $4.

She took the bottle to work the next day, plunked it down on the desk of then Executive Vice President for Operations Mike Norris and declared, "We should be ashamed that this bottle of water cost $4!"

Norris justified the price gouging by saying that 90% of the company's gross receipts went to pay for the ever increasing rental fees of the films they showed. Profits came from concessions. He claimed they needed profits to pay large salaries to retain the executives who led the firm. Thea, acquainted with the numbers from her work, asked how many houses one person really needs.

She had seen the enormous sums paid to these executives and their huge bonuses, yet they haggled over paying a $1,500 raise to accountants making $29,000 per year. And meanwhile, they overcharge the public!

Not long after this conversation, those executives whose salaries dictated that the company gouge the public at the concession stands, led Loewe’s Cineplex right into bankruptcy; it filed Chapter 11 and was sold to a company that buys out failed entities.

However, the CEO who presided over that debacle was given over $10,000,000 and a new car as his severance.

Disproportionate amounts of corporate profits go to executives. Princeton economist Paul Krugman notes that corporate culture started changing, profiting the few by exploiting the many, in the US in the 1980's and has continued to do so at a rapid pace since the advent of the Bush regime. What Thea observed has grown much more extreme since she lost her job when Loewe’s went bankrupt.

After an hour or so on the picket lines, enlightened about their situation, I bid the stagehands goodbye and headed back to Broadway then down to 42nd Street, past the police headquarters and army station. Unlike some, I have a sense that the police and army presence is not really for "safety" but comes from a more sinister motive. We in the US have become accustomed to that presence and are numb to it, but today it seems startling and disturbing to me. Everything about Broadway seems that way to me today.
_______________________________

Broadway World Strike Coverage: Unions Speak-Up at Conference

Monday, November 12, 2007; Posted: 1:44 AM - by Eugene Lovendusky
On a cold Sunday afternoon, Veteran's Day November 11, 2007, Local One organized their first press conference to answer questions and give direct-correspondence to members of the media. This opportunity to share their side of the negotiations was held at 1PM in St. Malachy's Catholic Church (239 West 49th Street).

Before the video cameras stood officers of Local One, including President James J. Claffey, union spokesperson Bruce Cohen, Actors' Equity Executive Director John Connolly and Local 802 (musicians' union) representative Bill Dennison; plus Local One officers including Line-Captains, the Negotiating Committee, Business Agents, Financial Security and Treasurer. Behind the podium hung a banner reading: "Theatrical Stage Employees T.P.U. Local One of New York City. Organized April 26, 1886."

In the crowd were union friends and family, wives and children, and several faces of the Broadway community, including musicians and actors. Among them including David Hyde-Pierce, Debra Monk and Karen Ziemba of Curtains, Jeffrey Schecter and Michael Berresse of A Chorus Line, Michele DeJean of Chicago, cast members of Spring Awakening and Legally Blonde) and many more.

The one-hour press conference provided an outlet for Claffey and Local One to explain their position, demands, and plans for progress. Claffey declined to comment on a time-table for the strike; thus leaving no apparent end in sight.
STATEMENTS OF THE CONFERENCE INCLUDE:

President James J. Claffey:

"This is everyone's problem on Broadway… We are fighting for our families. We have made a point of not bargaining in the press. We believe that amongst ourselves we can arrive at a deal that's honorable. That time has passed and it's necessary to defend ourselves in the press because we are being attacked... This did not just happen in the past three days. This is something that's been brewing for months and something we've tried to avoid."

"We have an $88,000 annual salary. Everyone has to keep in mind – that's if you're working 52 weeks a year. That's why we need to protect our job security. If you have a show that runs 3 weeks, we're working 3 weeks. If the house is dark for 3 months, we're not working there. The number lacks facts because that's if you're working 52 weeks a year. You can't say an 'average salary' unless you're working all year. $150,000 is absolutely not factual… The majority of the people who work in the theatres for Local One, are getting $67,000. We are out there working."

"We're fighting for the middle-class too. We're trying to keep our wages so we can afford the same ticket the public has to pay for. I can't apologize for suggesting that a union is fighting to protect our wages and families and kids. That's exactly what a union does. We happen to have the bargaining strength and capabilities to do so."

"As [The League] continues to say 'feather-bedding' and they keep calling us thieves, we're not going back to the table with that lack of respect. We have told them that it is not the honorable thing to do. We cannot negotiate under those circumstances… it's going to enrage my members. We're going to go back to the table when these people find honor."

"The $5.2 million [strike fund] runs-out when the strike is over. That's a defense fund for everyone in the theatre community affected by this labor dispute."

"After 22 or 23 meetings [with The League], we still go back and forth. We still give and fight; and we keep getting the same things from day one. They need to make a constructive adjustment….They've been trying to provoke us to strike for weeks…They wanted public support. They wanted us on the street. Then they implemented on us without bargaining. There is no honor in that."

"I have spoken to the Mayor several times. He could not be more of a gentlemen. He's been offering his services but I've respectfully declined. While we absolutely value the mayor and his intentions we believe that we should make a deal amongst the people. The best thing we could ask the Mayor is to tell these people that we have a job to do and in 121 years this Local has never struck Broadway, so there must be a problem."

"When we say there are 'minimums,' it's for our protection and the safety of the theatres that we don't believe are their priorities. Their priorities are the bottom-line. When we have a piece that requires so much weight and so much danger backstage. As the shows get bigger, they get harder. I have to deal with the protection of our members. When there is a piece that requires four-members to be moved, they want to do it with three. We can't count on them and their requirements for the bottom-line."

"We know what we need to achieve and we're willing to get there. There's a price to pay. Right now, we're not willing to pay that price. You want us to live with a strike for three or four weeks? What they're implementing is something we'd have to live with for three or four decades. We have a future to protect for our children. We have a future to protect for everyone we have responsibilities for. The future for the other unions as well."

"We are 8% the price of a ticket. They raise their ticket prices to $450 dollars, we don't get a raise. If we have one theatre with a huge amount of stagehands and that show becomes a hit – we get paid the same of a show that isn't a hit. We can't apologize for the product. We want every show to succeed. We're providing a service. We shouldn't get less from one theatre than another theatre because the show is not a good product."

Bill Dennison representing Local 802:

"I believe the responsibility for this work-stoppage on Broadway rests clearly in the hands of The League. You're dealing with a Local with an over one-hundred year history of never striking on Broadway. They've always found a way to reach an agreement with The League. What's different this time is you have a group on the other side of the table who are determined to turn the theatre-business into a profit-making machine…"

"Our worry is that they are driving this industry over a cliff in the search for greater and greater profits at the expense of those who work in the theatres. We are concerned about safety! Our members work in the bottom of the theatre, in the orchestra pit.

Those of you who have been in these theatres, you know the kind of equipment that is moving around backstage, that is flying over our heads. We want to make sure those theatres are safe and the confidence we have in the Local One members to run that theatre is what makes our members feel secure."

"Four years ago the stagehands were standing side-by-side with us in our effort to protect live theatre and live music on Broadway. We succeeded because of the solidarity of the other unions. Not because the other side of the table was trying to protect what we were fighting to protect. I believe that the unions on Broadway, all of us are going to stand side-by-side with the stagehands until this is solved in a way until the members of that proud union are satisfied. And we will continue to be there with them."

John Connolly Executive Director of Actors' Equity Association:

"We are not riff-raff. Whether you're moving a piece of scenery or controlling a sophisticated digital sound board. Whether you're dancing or acting or moving wardrobe from one side of the stage to the other. This is a highly sophisticated collaborative art that is peopled by professional workers from top to bottom."

"When you have an industry on Broadway where you jam tons and tons of 21st century technology into 19th century buildings, it takes skill, it takes courage, it takes consistency and it takes professionalism and collaboration and that's what makes the magic of the theatre."

"The theatres are not the four-walls on these many streets. The theatres are not the management offices. The theatres are not the advertisements in The New York Times. The theatres are the men and women here today working with the audiences who come to see the work we do. We regret that these theatres are closed. We are sorry that we are not where we want to be; on-stage entertaining our audiences eight shows or more a week. That's what we do. That's what we live for."

"We didn't shut the theatres. We didn't make $100 ticket prices. We didn't say it is our mission to refashion the economics of the theatre industry. The employers did that. And while they were misquoting the actual wages of real people are, in their news conference yesterday, I did not notice one single person in that news conference tell you how much they make!"

"To get these theatres back on-stage where they belong, and these men and women backstage where they belong, and the orchestras in the pit where they belong is to sit down in an honorable fashion and negotiate with honor. Not walk out of negotiations on October 10 and proclaim that you're going to impose your terms. That is not negotiation."

"I think it's remarkable here in the United States today that what seems weird to some people is that working people will actually stand-up and defend themselves."
__________________________________
Broadway Grosses: October 29 - November 4
By Andrew Ku
05 Nov 2007
All data provided by The League of American Theatres and Producers

Young Frankenstein is not reporting its grosses.
Production
(Theatre)
Weekly Gross Total Atten. Prev. Perf. Total Capacity Avg. Ticket Price Atten. %








A Bronx Tale
(Walter Kerr)
$315,143 4,738 0 7 947 $66.51 71.5%
A Chorus Line
(Schoenfeld)
$420,414 6,322 0 8 1,069 $66.50 73.9%
August: Osage County
(Imperial)
$198,575 4,652 8 0 1,439 $42.69 40.4%
Avenue Q
(Golden)
$321,143 4,940 0 8 796 $65.01 77.6%
Chicago
(Ambassador)
$480,581 6,815 0 8 1,080 $70.52 78.9%
Curtains
(Hirschfeld)
$584,216 7,740 0 8 1,422 $75.48 68.0%
Cymbeline
(Beaumont)
$97,663 2,429 4 0 1,057 $40.21 57.5%
Cyrano de Bergerac
(Rogers)
$663,399 9,528 2 6 1,347 $69.63 88.4%
Dr. Seuss'…Christmas
(St. James)
$465,658 10,255 9 0 1,706 $45.41 66.8%
Grease
(Atkinson)
$685,136 7,214 0 8 1,072 $94.97 84.1%
Hairspray
(Neil Simon)
$669,778 9,233 0 8 1,428 $72.54 80.8%
Jersey Boys
(August Wilson)
$1,217,333 9,850 0 8 1,222 $123.59 100.8%
Legally Blonde
(Palace)
$637,707 10,532 0 8 1,691 $60.55 77.9%
Les Miserables
(Broadhurst)
$408,335 6,609 0 8 1,122 $61.78 73.6%
Mamma Mia!
(Cadillac Winter Garden)
$880,667 10,764 0 8 1,498 $81.82 89.8%
Mary Poppins
(New Amsterdam)
$849,121 10,372 0 8 1,791 $81.87 72.4%
Mauritius
(Biltmore)
$208,776 3,746 0 8 650 $55.73 72.0%
Pygmalion
(American Airlines)
$286,310 5,409 0 8 740 $52.93 91.4%
Rent
(Nederlander)
$256,182 5,847 0 8 1,181 $43.81 61.9%
Rock 'n' Roll
(Jacobs)
$383,984 6,573 7 1 1,074 $58.42 76.5%
Spamalot
(Shubert)
$605,393 8,619 0 8 1,441 $70.24 74.8%
Spring Awakening
(O'Neill)
$620,110 7,392 0 8 1,090 $83.89 84.8%
The 25th…Bee
(Circle in Square)
$198,558 3,762 0 8 684 $52.78 68.8%
The Color Purple
(Broadway)
$795,211 11,335 0 8 1,718 $70.16 82.5%
The Drowsy Chaperone
(Marquis)
$369,051 6,673 0 8 1,611 $55.31 51.8%
The Farnsworth Invention
(Music Box)
$260,240 5,019 8 0 1,005 $51.85 62.4%
The Lion King
(Minskoff)
$1,093,694 12,279 0 8 1,654 $89.07 92.8%
The Little Mermaid
(Lunt-Fontanne)
$262,201 3,008 2 0 1,504 $87.17 100.0%
The Phantom of the Opera
(Majestic)
$634,883 9,907 0 8 1,607 $64.08 77.1%
The Ritz
(Studio 54)
$253,365 5,436 0 8 1,006 $46.61 67.5%
The Seafarer
(Booth)
$91,379 1,999 7 0 780 $45.71 36.6%
Wicked
(Gershwin)
$1,335,757 14,456 0 8 1,809 $92.40 99.9%
Xanadu
(Hayes)
$204,196 2,631 0 8 596 $77.61 55.2%

Comparison with Previous Week

Production
(Theatre)
Weekly Gross Last Week's Gross $ Change Atten. % Last Week's Atten. % Atten. % Change







A Bronx Tale
(Walter Kerr)
$315,143 $257,818 $57,325 71.5% 67.4% 4.1%
A Chorus Line
(Schoenfeld)
$420,414 $471,764 -$51,350 73.9% 79.9% -6.0%
August: Osage County
(Imperial)
$198,575 n/a n/a 40.4% n/a n/a
Avenue Q
(Golden)
$321,143 $329,207 -$8,064 77.6% 78.2% -0.6%
Chicago
(Ambassador)
$480,581 $482,610 -$2,029 78.9% 78.4% 0.5%
Curtains
(Hirschfeld)
$584,216 $756,068 -$171,852 68.0% 85.8% -17.8%
Cymbeline
(Beaumont)
$97,663 n/a n/a 57.5% n/a n/a
Cyrano de Bergerac
(Rogers)
$663,399 $664,607 -$1,208 88.4% 81.1% 7.3%
Dr. Seuss'…Christmas
(St. James)
$465,658 n/a n/a 66.8% n/a n/a
Grease
(Atkinson)
$685,136 $749,984 -$64,848 84.1% 90.1% -6.0%
Hairspray
(Neil Simon)
$669,778 $757,610 -$87,832 80.8% 93.1% -12.3%
Jersey Boys
(August Wilson)
$1,217,333 $1,269,259 -$51,926 100.8% 100.8% 0.0%
Legally Blonde
(Palace)
$637,707 $790,255 -$152,548 77.9% 76.5% 1.4%
Les Miserables
(Broadhurst)
$408,335 $455,038 -$46,704 73.6% 81.8% -8.2%
Mamma Mia!
(Cadillac Winter Garden)
$880,667 $951,206 -$70,539 89.8% 96.8% -6.9%
Mary Poppins
(New Amsterdam)
$849,121 $962,983 -$113,861 72.4% 89.6% -17.2%
Mauritius
(Biltmore)
$208,776 $233,700 -$24,924 72.0% 81.5% -9.4%
Pygmalion
(American Airlines)
$286,310 $282,800 $3,510 91.4% 93.1% -1.7%
Rent
(Nederlander)
$256,182 $249,173 $7,009 61.9% 52.3% 9.6%
Rock 'n' Roll
(Jacobs)
$383,984 $396,619 -$12,635 76.5% 85.2% -8.7%
Spamalot
(Shubert)
$605,393 $657,022 -$51,630 74.8% 80.6% -5.9%
Spring Awakening
(O'Neill)
$620,110 $715,147 -$95,037 84.8% 96.4% -11.6%
The 25th…Bee
(Circle in Square)
$198,558 $205,960 -$7,402 68.8% 71.4% -2.6%
The Color Purple
(Broadway)
$795,211 $788,546 $6,665 82.5% 79.5% 3.0%
The Drowsy Chaperone
(Marquis)
$369,051 $498,972 -$129,921 51.8% 60.8% -9.0%
The Farnsworth Invention
(Music Box)
$260,240 $250,010 $10,230 62.4% 60.0% 2.5%
The Lion King
(Minskoff)
$1,093,694 $1,163,944 -$70,250 92.8% 97.9% -5.1%
The Little Mermaid
(Lunt-Fontanne)
$262,201 n/a n/a 100.0% n/a n/a
The Phantom of the Opera
(Majestic)
$634,883 $677,308 -$42,426 77.1% 83.8% -6.8%
The Ritz
(Studio 54)
$253,365 $285,843 -$32,478 67.5% 77.8% -10.2%
The Seafarer
(Booth)
$91,379 n/a n/a 36.6% n/a n/a
Wicked
(Gershwin)
$1,335,757 $1,435,731 -$99,974 99.9% 99.5% 0.4%
Xanadu
(Hayes)
$204,196 $280,236 -$76,040 55.2% 69.9% -14.8%

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